#WriterlyWednesday

We are all writers. In academia, every facet of our work life is connected to one or more forms of writing. So, we decided to create a space to foster writing and engage in discussion about the craft of writing.

All members of the broader graduate community (grad students, faculty and staff) are invited to drop-in and take part in creating a ‘mid-week’ space for writing.

Every Wednesday, noon to 2:00 p.m.

Location: Thistle 253 (TH)

Each 2-hour session will begin with a 20 min facilitated conversation or presentation on topics related to writer and writing. The rest of the time; we’ll write. You are welcome to bring your laptop, writing resources and your lunch!

Winter Term- #WriterlyWednesday Schedule:

Wednesday, January 11: Making Writing Resolutions That Stick It’s the new year. Join us for the launch of the 2017 #WriterlyWednesday season with a conversation about making writing resolutions that you can maintain for the year. Academic writing consultant Dr. Daveena Tauber of Scholar-Studio.com will share her wisdom and success strategies.

Wednesday, January 18: Mastering Office 365 Join this workshop to explore new exciting features of Office 365 and see why it’s not the same Microsoft Office you’ve used for years. Write from anywhere and with anyone. Create, save, share, and collaborate. Learn about key features to help you polish your writing and make time-consuming tasks a breeze. Instructor: Laura Lane

Wednesday, January 26: Graduate Student Writing Groups Starting an academic writing group for graduate students? Think you might benefit from a graduate student writing group? Join us as we discuss how to form and structure a graduate student writing group. We’ll also discuss some of the barriers and other practical considerations. Facilitators:  Karen Julien and Jacqueline Beres

Wednesday, February 1: Finding Focus and Flow This free flow responsive writing activity will help you 1) think about conceptualizing your ideas, 2) make your implicit ideas explicit, 3) identify any gaps in your thinking, and 4) with a strategy you can apply in your future writing. Nicola Simmons, Faculty of Education

Remaining dates TBA

Fall Term- #WriterlyWednesday Schedule:

Wednesday, Sept. 14: Creating Your Writing Practice Only you can create and commit to a habit of writing thats right for you to help you both flourish and finish. Together, we’ll discuss and share insights and tips we’ve gained on our writing practices. Lianne Fisher, Centre for Pedagogical Innovation.

Wednesday, Sept. 21: Struggling With Citations? There’s a Tool for That! Citation management software can help you store and organize references and save time by automatically generating in-text citations and bibliographies. This session will introduce you to the range of features available in three free web-based citation management tools: Endnote Basic, Zotero and Mendeley. Jennifer Thiessen, Library Services.

Wednesday, Sept. 28: Finding Your Writer’s Voice & Identity Have you considered why you write and to whom you are writing to? How do you want to be known. Are you ready to make some courageous changes? In this session, we’ll address these big questions and help you discover your writer’s voice and identity. Snežana Ratković, Faculty of Education

Wednesday, Oct. 5: Pomodoro Power It’s midterm. Learn the Pomodoro technique to manage time and keep yourself writing. We’ll introduce this simple format and then power write throughout our time block. Michelle McGinn Faculty of Education.

Wednesday, Oct. 12: TBA ‘Open Mic’

Wednesday, Oct. 19: Imposters Amongst Us: How to Write Even When You Feel Like a Fraud It’s common for graduate students to feel underqualified and unprepared despite tremendous skills and accomplishments. Let’s talk about these feelings and how to move beyond them. Michelle McGinn, Faculty of Education

Wednesday, Oct. 26: Sketchnoting: Using Visual Notes to Structure Your Writing Explore non-linear methods of organizing information to record, brainstorm, plan, and communicate your ideas. Giulia Forsythe, Centre for Pedagogical Innovation

Wednesday, Nov. 2: Creative Outlines, This free flow responsive writing activity will help you 1) think about conceptualizing your ideas, 2) make your implicit ideas explicit, 3) identify any gaps in your thinking, and 4) with a strategy you can apply in your future writing. Nicola Simmons, Faculty of Education

Wednesday, Nov. 9: Myth Busters: The Writing Edition False beliefs or myths about writing can bog down our process. ‘Writing is hard’ and ‘waiting for inspiration’ are popular misconceptions. Together we will unpack some common myths and assumptions and consider the evidence about writing and writers. Darrin Sunstrum, Faculty of Humanities.

Wednesday, Nov. 16: Don’t publish and perish: Learn how to evaluate a journal and decide if it’s right for you So, you’ve finally completed your research and now you want to disseminate it via a “good” journal. The scholarly publishing system is incredibly complex, with new journals launching every day and others folding. And some journals – operated by so-called predatory publishers — are little more than scam artists: publishing with them could damage your academic career. We’ll explore some tips for evaluating the quality and credibility of journals and publishers. Elizabeth Yates,  Liaison Services.

Wednesday, Nov. 23:  Empowering Graduate Student Writing and Writers The ability to communicate clearly and reliably is a key transferable skill across university programs. Degree-level expectations necessitate that graduate students contribute to scholarly conversations and, increasingly, publish their work. Drs. Snežana Ratković and Michelle McGinn (Faculty of Education) developed and co-teach an interdisciplinary graduate course on scholarly writing and publishing. As instructors, they participate alongside students in all activities, creating a supportive community of writers. Together, they will present a short, visually engaging Pecha Kucha presentation about the course, and open a conversation with Writerly Wednesdays’ writers about innovative ways for supporting and sustaining writing and writers. Come write with us on #WriterlyWednesday and consider registering for the course. Dr. Snežana Ratković and Dr. Michelle McGinn

Wednesday, Nov. 30: Reading Ourselves: Imagining the Reader in the Writing Process, Imagine going anywhere in the world on your own for a year to write. Now, imagine your reader; someone keenly interested in reading your work. Who is this person? This writing exercise will enable you to (a) identify your audience, (b) diminish your struggles with a harsh inner critic, and (c) develop a clearer sense of your writer’s identity. Snežana Ratković, Faculty of Education.

late January TBA Together can be better: Starting an academic writing group for graduate students Think you might benefit from a graduate student writing group? Join us as we discuss how to form and structure a graduate student writing group. We’ll also discuss some of the barriers and other practical considerations. Karen Julien and Jacqueline Beres